Independent Living Center

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Alongside most of the pieces, you'll find an artist's statement where the artist has shared a bit about themselves. The show reflects a partnership between TRAILS and Homer Council on the Arts (HCOA).  If you scroll to the end of the show; you'll find photos of artwork as it was displayed in March 2020 at HCOA.  ENJOY!!!


The Homer News did a wonderful article about the art show.  You can view it by clicking here: Artists look at disability in Homer Council on the Arts show _ Homer News.pdf


Title: Hooked (acrylic on canvas)

Artist: Lee Kline

Artist's statement:

Finding out the calm that happens with me while painting helps  me focus on the paint so my PTSD and anxiety don't overwhelm me.


Title: Home (watercolor on canvas)

Artist: Myrna Kuchenoff

Artist's statement:

For another side of Myrna, click:   https://www.homernews.com/news/and-the-gold-goes-to/


Title: Magnificent (acrylic on canvas)

Artist: Mari Bacher

Artist's statement:

This is about disability. The flowers are like people; they've got different abilities, sizes and colors. Together they look beautiful. The big flower is God. The little flowers are nice to the big flower.


Title: Embroidary #1 (cotton thread)

Artist: Myrna Kuchenoff

Artist's statement:

For another side of Myrna, click:   https://www.homernews.com/news/and-the-gold-goes-to/


Title: Embroidary #2 (cotton thread)

Artist: Myrna Kuchenoff

Artist's statement:

For another side of Myrna, click:   https://www.homernews.com/news/and-the-gold-goes-to/



Title: Butterfly (mixed media)
Artist: Emily Coble

Artist's statement

[Emily graduated from Homer High in 2017.]



Title: Love (mixed media, fiber)
Artist: Emily Coble

Artist's statement

[Emily graduated from Homer High in 2017.]



Title: The Flash (3D paper cutouts)
Artist: Xander Long

Artist's statement:

"Hi. I'm Xander Long, I like anime. I like watching and drawing anime. I love riding my bike, I like playing video games. When I was 7, that's when my brother told me about Minecraft, that's one of my favorite games. It's one of my favorite games to this day. I recently found out I have brain damage. I'm doing this artwork because I love doing art and I'm going to show it to people what I do. I'm a fan of the Flash tv shows, and this took 2 weeks."


Title: Untitled #1 (acrylic pour)
Artist: Connie Hines, Cripple Creek Art

Artist's statement:

Cripple Creek Art was created by two spinal cord injured women. These ladies were quite artistic before they had their injuries, and now are getting back into art with the acrylic pour to improve their quality of life. They get together every Sunday afternoon between 1 and 5:30 pm to do the art and have a great time. Boy do we ever make a mess! It takes us at least an hour to clean up, but we enjoy every minute of it and hope you're going to enjoy looking at some of our paintings that we do. Thank you for appreciating and supporting our art.


Title: Untitled #2 (acrylic pour)

Artist: Connie Hines, Cripple Creek Art

Artist's statement:

Cripple Creek Art was created by two spinal cord injured women. These ladies were quite artistic before they had their injuries, and now are getting back into art with the acrylic pour to improve their quality of life. They get together every Sunday afternoon between 1 and 5:30 pm to do the art and have a great time. Boy do we ever make a mess! It takes us at least an hour to clean up, but we enjoy every minute of it and hope you're going to enjoy looking at some of our paintings that we do. Thank you for appreciating and supporting our art.


Title: Untitled #3 (acrylic pour)

Artist: Connie Hines, Cripple Creek Art

Artist's statement:

Cripple Creek Art was created by two spinal cord injured women. These ladies were quite artistic before they had their injuries, and now are getting back into art with the acrylic pour to improve their quality of life. They get together every Sunday afternoon between 1 and 5:30 pm to do the art and have a great time. Boy do we ever make a mess! It takes us at least an hour to clean up, but we enjoy every minute of it and hope you're going to enjoy looking at some of our paintings that we do. Thank you for appreciating and supporting our art.


Title: Untitled #4 (acrylic pour)

Artist: Yvonne Bouchard, Cripple Creek Art

Artist's statement:

Cripple Creek Art was created by two spinal cord injured women. These ladies were quite artistic before they had their injuries, and now are getting back into art with the acrylic pour to improve their quality of life. They get together every Sunday afternoon between 1 and 5:30 pm to do the art and have a great time. Boy do we ever make a mess! It takes us at least an hour to clean up, but we enjoy every minute of it and hope you're going to enjoy looking at some of our paintings that we do. Thank you for appreciating and supporting our art.


Title: Untitled #5 (acrylic pour)

Artist: Yvonne Bouchard, Cripple Creek Art

Artist's statement:

Cripple Creek Art was created by two spinal cord injured women. These ladies were quite artistic before they had their injuries, and now are getting back into art with the acrylic pour to improve their quality of life. They get together every Sunday afternoon between 1 and 5:30 pm to do the art and have a great time. Boy do we ever make a mess! It takes us at least an hour to clean up, but we enjoy every minute of it and hope you're going to enjoy looking at some of our paintings that we do. Thank you for appreciating and supporting our art.


Title: see individual pieces below

Artist: Michelle Melchert

Artist's statement:

Art became a passion when I was injured 6 years ago. Painting, fused glass, mosaicing, and last year, learning about epoxy/resin river pouring. Eighteen surgeries later...with my friends Gayle Forrest and Lucy Basch, we designed and created the functional artwork. These products are now part of my business. Hand-picked woods, one-of-a-kind designs, amazing pieces! This art is my therapy. It continues to grow as I heal. It heals me as I work.


Title: Reaching Out (epoxy/resin, birch and cherry wood)

Artist: Michelle Melchert

Artist's statement: See above


Title: The Beach (epoxy/resin, birch and cherry wood)

Artist: Michelle Melchert

Artist's statement: See above


Title: Golden Delight (epoxy/resin, birch and cherry wood)

Artist: Michelle Melchert

Artist's statement: See above


Title: Finding a Porpoise (wash and oil pastels)

Artist: Claire O'Donnell

Artist's statement:

My mother was blind in the end, and my grandfather. Little by little I'm losing mine. I press to create while I can.


Title: Self-Portrait at Pyramid Bluff (watercolor, giclee print)

Artist: Charlotte Adamson

Artist's statement:

I am an animal lover who has spent much of life caring for and rehabilitating injured wildlife.


Title: Mysterious Snowy Morning (photography)

Artist: Clara Cole

Artist's statement:

I'm Clara Cole and I was born in Fairbanks almost 54 years ago. My family and I moved to Homer when I was 6 months old. I feel that photography is a personal form of expression that everybody can relate to, if you have a disability or not. I got serious about photography when I took a class at Kachemak Bay Campus with Taz Tally.


Title: Slugs Forever (print book)

Artists: Maggie Winston and Marianne Schlegelmilch

Artist's statement:

Maggie Winston (illustrator) is a mother of twins, a full-time college student, an artist, and a member of the Board of Directors for the ILC, among many other titles. She became suddenly paralyzed from the neck down in 2005 due to a rare autoimmune disorder called transverse myelitis. All of the work for this book was done by a pencil or paint brush in her mouth.
Artist's statement:

Marianne Schlegelmilch is the author of two children's books, two modern Alaska Tales, and three all-Alaska mysteries. Always, she incorporates wildlife and animals into her stories that speak of the goodness in life prevailing over human frailties. She resides in Homer, Alaska, and real life scenes from her own backyard are the inspiration for this fictional tale.


Title: Ocean Winter (acrylic, sharpie, stone)
Artist: Veronica Murphy

Artist's statement:

I am a "folk artist." I recently started painting stones when I moved to Homer. I believe that the "rock painting movement" has taken off because painting stones is a way to express your feelings through art. People of all ages can do this. You don't need any special skills. I also believe it's a form of therapy for many. You can bring joy to so many, including yourself when you paint stones. People with mental and physical disabilities can benefit from painting stones.


Title: Summer Breeze (digital print on archival paper, 1st print)
Artist: Charles Barker

Artist's statement:

My name is Charles. I was born with a condition called Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Confined to a wheelchair at 14 I found that art was a very therapeutic way to express myself. I started volunteering for the Disability Pride Celebration 2 years ago, which gave me an outlet to express what I think matters most to me. I volunteer at an elementary school each week to teach art with my former high school art teacher and also participate with elders on art projects at the nursing home.
I enjoy any type of painting, whatever I can get my hands on, to make art with. But I have also found that digital art is more accessible for my condition that affects my motor skills.


Title: Lost No Longer (mixed media with crystal and copper) (In memory of Jeff Wraly)
Artist: Jean M. Steele

Artist's statement:

My work is my recovery from disability. My artwork brings a fullness and completion to my daily activities. I've been an artist for as long as I can remember and had depression for nearly as long. I had severe self-destructive ideation from the age of 16. So my artwork gives me a way of relating to the world. Some people "get it." Some don't. But if this activity gives me self-worth I can continue with it without being concerned about approval from anyone. Pouring myself into various media has been lifesaving.


Title: Sailing (acrylic on canvas)
Artist: Craig Forrest

Artist's statement:

[For another side of Craig, see https://www.homeryachtclub.org/.]


Title: There Is No Place Like Gnome (acrylic on canvas)
Artist: Elvira Rios

Artist's statement:

While my partner was going through numerous surgeries, I needed to find a way to cope. Art and craft items help me focus my energy and create beauty. With my diabetes, keeping my hands busy and designing new objects helps my mood and energizes me to create more.


Title of pieces: Taster Spoon, Star Spoon, Triple-Pointed Hair Comb, Two-Pointed Hair Comb
Artist: Mike Alaska, the Spoon Guy

Artist's statement:

Mike loves using repurposed materials--things that others have cast off. One of his media is wood, which he carves into functional, beautiful shapes. Mike also loves animals and what they communicate if we're willing to listen; with respect, he uses their bones, horns, and hides in his artwork. "Being an elder without having the same physical body I had as a young person pushed me to realize that I needed to create small functional art as I developed age-related disabilities. So I was pushed by time into doing art with small pieces. All materials I use are from repurposed sources."


Title: Taster Spoon (Carved Lacewood from an old ship)
Artist: Mike Alaska, the Spoon Guy

Artist's statement: See above.


Title: Star Spoon (Carved wood, with opals and muskox cap)
Artist: Mike Alaska, the Spoon Guy

Artist's statement: See above.


Title: Two-Pointed Hair Comb (Ivory with inset rubies and azurite)

Artist: Mike Alaska, the Spoon Guy

Artist's statement: See above.


Title: Triple-Pointed Hair Comb (bone with 5 garnets and inlaid azurite)

Artist: Mike Alaska, the Spoon Guy

Artist's statement: See above.


Titles: Neck Warmer/Headbands and

Yellow Booties
Artist: Karla McKillirick
Artist's statement:

Karla started knitting around 10 years old. She became blind as a young teenager. She has Usher's syndrome type II/retinitis pigmentosa (a genetic disorder). She loves to knit. She traveled to training centers for the blind to get help with certain living skills. Mostly, she says, it helped with my attitude! Karla uses software on her computer called "JAWS" and this program is able to read the text out loud.


Title: Children's Sweaters (yellow, blue, rose-green with hood) (all are knitted from acrylic yarn)

Artist: Karla McKillirick

Silent auction current or minimum bid $40

If you'd like to purchase this work, email dlehner@peninsulailc.org before April 30 and BE SURE TO INCLUDE COLOR OF SWEATER.

Artist's statement: see entry above


Title: Country Goodness

Artist: Shaunti Johnson

Artist's statement: 


Title: Night Joy (acrylic on canvas)

Artist: Shaunti Johnson

Artist's statement: 


Title: Cactus Prosthetic (sculpture)

Artist: Michael Gavillot

Artist's statement:

I have a prosthetic leg which I got from a climbing accident when I was in my early 20's. I thought that a prosthetic could be wearable art like a tattoo. Having this disability is like a gift. It has taken me down this great path and made me appreciate things on a much bigger level. I have realized there's nothing a gimp can't do and have spent the last 10 years helping others with disability realize that as well.


Title: Alone Together Part 1

Artist: Beverly Cole

Artist's statement:

I held these pieces in my head for months, thinking about inclusion and what it means to me. As I finally laid them down on paper by block printing, these words came to me very strongly: "I'll stand alone. I'll stand together. Just let me be me."
I felt empowered and found a level of comfort saying these words. I felt a shift in my footing and how I stood firmer and taller. Finally, not scared to stand alone or scared to stand together, crossing that Anxiety Threshold, opening myself up to be able to be included. I am who I am! I had to accept that.
I feel Identity and Support from these two pieces.

I felt empowered and found a level of comfort saying these words. I felt a shift in my footing and how I stood firmer and taller. Finally, not scared to stand alone or scared to stand together, crossing that Anxiety Threshold, opening myself up to be able to be included. I am who I am! I had to accept that.

I feel Identity and Support from these two pieces.



Title: Alone Together Part 2

Artist: Beverly Cole

Artist's statement: See above.


Title: I Have A Voice (mixed media acrylic and pen)

Artist: Anna Sawyer

Artist's statement:

This piece is an interpretation of the isolation that so often accompanies mental health challenges. It is intended to reflect the difficulty inherent to finding and assigning the right words to those experiences, especially given the stigma that continues to surround mental health problems.


Title: Blind Horse Boogie (photography)

Artist: Devony Lehner

Artist's statement:

I have learned more than I can put into words from getting to spend time with those having disabilities--whether human, horse, or other living being. These interactions have made me a kinder, wiser, better person.  I tried to articulate a bit of Sweetheart's way of knowing and being in the poem that accompanies this photo. Here's the poem:
He sees you.
But not with that cloudy glass ball of an eye
that was sandblasted so many years before now
by someone's anger.
He sees you,
alert with his nostrils and semaphore ears,
reading the touch, in the waves of the wind,
of your breathing.
Now he's waiting
for the dance of your warmth, like a blanket of sun,
to alight and align to his rhythm of stride
through the meadow.


Title: Missing in Action (colored pencil)

Artist: Thelma Gower

Artist's statement:

As an American born abroad, I grew up in war-torn Europe where artistic materials almost did not exist. For many years, all that could be purchased were simple colored pencils. Life became more pleasant after moving to the US, where my parents could buy me all manners of artistic materials--and, they did. I had the chance to dabble in everything from acrylic painting to photography.

In college, at the University of Washington in Seattle, I relied upon drawing and painting to give me a mental break from my studies (in Chinese and Russian Studies). At that time, I was blessed with the ability to take all of Bill Holm's Northwest Native art classes (who received an honorary doctoral degree from UAF in 2008). This spurred a life-long interest in North American Native art and was one of the reasons for my retirement move to Alaska.
Every time I think of Homer, I see an octopus--a very colorful creature, capable of doing just about anything at any time. This drawing celebrates Homer and its capability to enjoy life to the fullest, even if you have two tentacles missing in action.


Title: Fish On (laser-burned wood)

Artist: Scott Johnson (pseudonym Ponson)

Artist's statement:

Scott Johnson, originally from Delta Junction, moved to Homer over 20 years ago. His activities were somewhat limited because of his disability, but he found great joy in expressing his talents through his cartoons. Scott experimented with different ways of using his cartoons. He especially loved creating these wooden plaques using a laser burning technique. Scott knew he was not long for this material world, so he donated his art to help raise funds for the Independent Living Center. Scott was a wonderful, kind person.


Title: Alaskan Fishing Rig (laser-burned wood, two available)

Artist: Scott Johnson (pseudonym Ponson)

Artist's statement:

Scott Johnson, originally from Delta Junction, moved to Homer over 20 years ago. His activities were somewhat limited because of his disability, but he found great joy in expressing his talents through his cartoons. Scott experimented with different ways of using his cartoons. He especially loved creating these wooden plaques using a laser burning technique. Scott knew he was not long for this material world, so he donated his art to help raise funds for the Independent Living Center. Scott was a wonderful, kind person.


Title: Northern Nights (acrylic on canvas)

Artist: Shaunti Johnson 

Artist's statement:


Title: Fred

Artist: Erin Petrie

Artist's statement:


Title: Modern Art

Artist: Aron Hanson

Artist's statement:


Title: Watermelon Fire and Ice (acrylic on canvas)

Artist: Brandon Dillon

Artist's statement:

I'm a male, 23 years old. I have a mild case of autism and cerebral palsy. I'm disabled. I hope you enjoy my artwork.


Title: Starfish Wishes (acrylic on canvas)

Artist: L.M.

Artist's statement:


Title: Ride the Wave (acrylic on canvas)

Artist: anonymous

Artist's statement:


Title: Untitled

Artist: Arlyn Davidson

Artist's statement:

Arlyn, who is disabled since the 1980's, loves to paint and has produced almost 100 paintings for friends, family, and his mom, Mossy Kilcher. He is a happy, loved person and lives near his family in Homer. This is his big art show debut!


Title: Flying Skater

Artist: Erik Behnke

Artist's statement:

Erik is an adult artist and Special Olympic athlete from Homer, Alaska. He was born when his parents were trappers at Lake Clarke and grew up in many small towns and villages with his mother, a bush/rural special education teacher. Today he lives in Homer. He draws all his black lines in his own creative style and adds color with Pantone Tria markers as he imagines. As an adult with Down syndrome and autism, Erik's innocence prevails in all of his art. His goal is to work independently as an Alaskan artist, sharing his colorful charming view of life.


Title: Downhill Snowboarder

Artist: Erik Behnke

Artist's statement:

Erik is an adult artist and Special Olympic athlete from Homer, Alaska. He was born when his parents were trappers at Lake Clarke and grew up in many small towns and villages with his mother, a bush/rural special education teacher. Today he lives in Homer. He draws all his black lines in his own creative style and adds color with Pantone Tria markers as he imagines. As an adult with Down syndrome and autism, Erik's innocence prevails in all of his art. His goal is to work independently as an Alaskan artist, sharing his colorful charming view of life.


Title: Fleas (watercolor and ink)

Artist: Jim Welch (JPW)

Jim was the special guest artist for this show.  See his biography at: Jim Welch guest artist bio.pdf

Artist's statement:

It's okay for a dog to have a certain amount of fleas. It keeps him from thinking too much about being a dog.


Title: Feeling for the Roots (watercolor and ink)

Artist: Jim Welch (JPW)

Jim was the special guest artist for this show.  See his biography at: Jim Welch guest artist bio.pdf

Artist's statement:


Title: I Can't Hear You (watercolor and ink)

Artist: Jim Welch (JPW)

Jim was the special guest artist for this show.  See his biography at: Jim Welch guest artist bio.pdf

Artist's statement:

I can't hear you. I have a banana in my ear (when explaining is complaining)


Title: Rewiring My Brain (fused glass)

Artist: Cindy Nelson

Artist's statement:

I was diagnosed 19 years ago with multiple sclerosis. I moved up to Alaska for a better life while taking care of myself having MS. I truly believe that I have MS, but it does not have me. I try hard to find the right exercise or movement class for me. I believe that as someone with MS I can work with my body to rewire the nerves in my brain. With correct and proper movement I can achieve this. Physical therapy and movement classes have helped a lot. This piece shows what the nerves look like in my brain while reconnecting, thereby rewiring my nerves!


Title: Jello Mellow (mosaic)

Artist: Elvira Rios

Artist's statement:

While my partner was going through numerous surgeries, I needed to find a way to cope. Art and craft items help me focus my energy and create beauty. With my diabetes, keeping my hands busy and designing new objects helps my mood and energizes me to create more.



Title: Jellyfish (mosaic)

Artist: Janice Taylor

Artist's statement:


Title: Halibut (mosaic)

Artist: Gayle Forrest

Artist's statement:

I am a beginning artist in mosaic art and acrylic painting. Not all disabilities are visible on the surface, and sometimes the disabilities are disguised with "glitter" and "shiny" things. That was the thought behind the creation of the halibut



Title: Lighthouse Hook Rug (cotton thread)

Artist: Myrna Kuchenoff

Artist's statement:

For another side of Myrna, click: https://www.homernews.com/news/and-the-gold-goes-to/


Title: Flowerpots (clay)

Artist: Myrna Kuchenoff

Artist's statement:

For another side of Myrna, click: https://www.homernews.com/news/and-the-gold-goes-to/


Title: Seashells (clay)

Artist: Myrna Kuchenoff

Artist's statement:

For another side of Myrna, click: https://www.homernews.com/news/and-the-gold-goes-to/


Title: Behind the Mask (crayon, water color, rice paper)

Artist: Cora Trowbridge

Artist's statement:

My name is Cora Trowbridge and I am a student at the college as well as employed at the Senior Center. I graduated from UAA with an Associate's in early childhood development, and returned to Homer with the hope of giving back to the community while embracing the support it provides.
I personally experience a disability largely invisible. It's called NVLD or Non-Verbal Learning Disorder. This has characteristics of autism and Asperger, but primarily affects my ability to read social cues, nonverbal communication such as body language, tone, and facial expressions. In addition, I experience delays in some of my language processing so that I hear and decode more slowly than some. These effects have challenged me in a variety of areas in my daily life including but not limited to my social relationships and how I perceive the world. I've often found myself in situations where I've been taken advantage of, misunderstood and bullied due to the inability to read others' motives or intent or simply what they were trying to communicate.
I am very fortunate to have a vast support network and sense of community that has helped me navigate life to the point I'm able to function today. I have been very blessed to have many people who have focused more on my gifts and who I am as a person rather than strictly on the label itself. I strive for acceptance just as any human. We all have life areas where we struggle. Sometimes those are obvious, others they are not. However none of us want to be known simply for those struggles. We all are so much more.



Title: Lion (colored pencil)

Artist: Cora Trowbridge

Artist's statement: see previous entry


Title: Why I Write (poem)

Artist: Cora Trowbridge

Artist's statement:

My name is Cora Trowbridge and I am a student at the college as well as employed at the Senior Center. I graduated from UAA with an Associate's in early childhood development, and returned to Homer with the hope of giving back to the community while embracing the support it provides.
I personally experience a disability largely invisible. It's called NVLD or Non-Verbal Learning Disorder. This has characteristics of autism and Asperger, but primarily affects my ability to read social cues, nonverbal communication such as body language, tone, and facial expressions. In addition, I experience delays in some of my language processing so that I hear and decode more slowly than some. These effects have challenged me in a variety of areas in my daily life including but not limited to my social relationships and how I perceive the world. I've often found myself in situations where I've been taken advantage of, misunderstood and bullied due to the inability to read others' motives or intent or simply what they were trying to communicate.
I am very fortunate to have a vast support network and sense of community that has helped me navigate life to the point I'm able to function today. I have been very blessed to have many people who have focused more on my gifts and who I am as a person rather than strictly on the label itself. I strive for acceptance just as any human. We all have life areas where we struggle. Sometimes those are obvious, others they are not. However none of us want to be known simply for those struggles. We all are so much more.


Title: Triptych (acrylic on wood cabinet doors)

Artist: Sadie Mae Millard

Artist's statement:

My name is Sadie and I'm a local artist that deals with PTSD as well as bipolar disorder. I was diagnosed when I was a child. I have been in a path of recovery from my childhood traumas for years, through the world of art. I use art as a tool to cope with symptoms related to PTSD. I paint my pain and fears out on canvas, wood, and paper. Really anything that is viable is usable, repurposing matter to express myself through art is my way of changing and accepting my view of myself for the positive.


Title: Triptych Piece 1 (acrylic on wood cabinet doors)

Artist: Sadie Mae Millard

Artist's statement:

My name is Sadie and I'm a local artist that deals with PTSD as well as bipolar disorder. I was diagnosed when I was a child. I have been in a path of recovery from my childhood traumas for years, through the world of art. I use art as a tool to cope with symptoms related to PTSD. I paint my pain and fears out on canvas, wood, and paper. Really anything that is viable is usable, repurposing matter to express myself through art is my way of changing and accepting my view of myself for the positive.


Title: Triptych Piece 2 (acrylic on wood cabinet doors)

Artist: Sadie Mae Millard

Artist's statement: see entry above


Title: Triptych Piece 3 (acrylic on wood cabinet doors)

Artist: Sadie Mae Millard

Artist's statement:

My name is Sadie and I'm a local artist that deals with PTSD as well as bipolar disorder. I was diagnosed when I was a child. I have been in a path of recovery from my childhood traumas for years, through the world of art. I use art as a tool to cope with symptoms related to PTSD. I paint my pain and fears out on canvas, wood, and paper. Really anything that is viable is usable, repurposing matter to express myself through art is my way of changing and accepting my view of myself for the positive.


Title: Purple Doily (crochet thread and beads)

Artist: Toni Cooper

Artist's statement:

[My work relates to disability because] it helps me focus.


Title: Dusk (acrylic on canvas)

Artist: Gayle Forrest

Artist's statement:

I am a beginning artist in mosaic art and acrylic painting. Not all disabilities are visible on the surface, and sometimes the disabilities are disguised with "glitter" and "shiny" things. That was the thought behind the creation of the halibut.


Title: Different Strains (acrylic on canvas)

Artist: Brandon Dillon

Artist's statement:

I am a male, 23 years old. I have a mild case of autism and cerebral palsy. I'm disabled. I hope you enjoy my artwork.


Title: Handmade Jewelry (epoxy resin and mixed fiber media)

left = orange keychain, 

middle = pendant,

right = black next band

Artist: Elvira Rios

Artist's statement:

While my partner was going through numerous surgeries, I needed to find a way to cope. Art and craft items help me focus my energy and create beauty. With my diabetes, keeping my hands busy and designing new objects helps my mood and energizes me to create more.


Title: Handmade Jewelry (epoxy resin and mixed fiber media)

left = turquoise bracelet, 

middle = orange bracelet,

right = multicolored bracelet

Artist: Elvira Rios

Artist's statement:

While my partner was going through numerous surgeries, I needed to find a way to cope. Art and craft items help me focus my energy and create beauty. With my diabetes, keeping my hands busy and designing new objects helps my mood and energizes me to create more.


Title: Beaded Necklaces (beads, glass, plastic)

top necklace = short necklace with large beads, 

middle = medium necklace with small beads, ,

bottom = long necklace with mixed beads

Artist: Myrna Kuchenoff

Artist's statement:

For another side of Myrna, click: https://www.homernews.com/news/and-the-gold-goes-to/


Title: Beaded Necklaces (beads, glass, plastic)

top necklace = short necklace with large beads, 

middle = medium necklace with small beads, ,

bottom = long necklace with mixed beads

Artist: Myrna Kuchenoff

Artist's statement:

For another side of Myrna, click: https://www.homernews.com/news/and-the-gold-goes-to/









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